Friday, July 31, 2015

Zimbabwe Reveals Truth About “Cecil the Lion”

      This article brings the right perspective to the uproar over Cecil the lion.  If we spent a 10th of the time that's been devoted to this ridiculous scenario in talking about murdered babies in-and out-of the womb maybe something constructive could be done to help.
      People obviously don't have enough to worry about and have lost their moral compass when they can spend so much time and millions of dollars on animal rights while hardly giving a thought to the babies that are sacrificed daily for convenience.  What a topsy/turvy world.

Zimbabwe Reveals Shocking Truth About “Cecil the Lion” Animal Rights Groups Are Desperate to Cover Up

Both social media and the progressive mainstream media have been in an uproar over the past few days about the death of “Cecil,” a 13-year-old lion in Zimbabwe.
Cecil was killed in an organized licensed hunt by a big game hunter, Minnesota dentist Dr. Walter Palmer, who has now gone into hiding after receiving numerous death threats from outraged animal rights activists.
However, it would appear that the outrage surrounding the death of Cecil is what is commonly known as a “First World Problem,” as residents of Zimbabwe were mostly unaware of, and really don’t care about, the death of just another lion.
“What lion?” was the response of acting Information Minister Prisca Mupfumira, after being asked about the death of Cecil.
Though the government had yet to give an official response to the lion hunt, local authorities opened an investigation into whether the professional guides who led the hunt abided by the rules and regulations in place for such things.
According to Yahoo News, that hasn’t stopped angry animal rights and anti-hunting activists from ruining the life of Dr. Palmer, with some calling for his arrest, extradition and even death for hunting the lion with a bow and arrow and finishing it off with a gun.
But most people in Zimbabwe don’t care about the dead lion, as they have much greater problems to deal with, such as an 80 percent unemployment rate, insane monetary inflation and a hugely corrupt government.
“Are you saying that all this noise is about a dead lion? Lions are killed all the time in this country,” said Tryphina Kaseke, a used-clothes hawker on the streets of Harare. “What is so special about this one?”
The truth is, most locals in Zimbabwe actually look forward to the big game hunts that Westerners engage in, as the high price tag for the hunts means money pumped into the local economy, not to mention the meat from such hunts is required by law to be given to local tribes and villages.
“Why are the Americans more concerned than us?” said Joseph Mabuwa, a 33-year-old father of two. “We never hear them speak out when villagers are killed by lions and elephants in Hwange.”
Lions and other large animals are typically viewed as dangerous by the local population, and if these animals are not hunted, their populations will explode and bring about all sorts of other issues, like rampant disease and increased attacks on people.
If only as much outrage over a dead and dismembered lion were directed at those who kill and dismemberhundreds of thousands of babies per year, our society might have a moral leg to stand on.

No comments: